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// Copyright 2005, Google Inc.
// All rights reserved.
//
// Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without
// modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions are
// met:
//
// * Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright
// notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.
// * Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above
// copyright notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer
// in the documentation and/or other materials provided with the
// distribution.
// * Neither the name of Google Inc. nor the names of its
// contributors may be used to endorse or promote products derived from
// this software without specific prior written permission.
//
// THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND CONTRIBUTORS
// "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT
// LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR
// A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE COPYRIGHT
// OWNER OR CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL,
// SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT
// LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE,
// DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY
// THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT
// (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE
// OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.
// A sample program demonstrating using Google C++ testing framework.
//
// Author: wan@google.com (Zhanyong Wan)
// In this example, we use a more advanced feature of Google Test called
// test fixture.
//
// A test fixture is a place to hold objects and functions shared by
// all tests in a test case. Using a test fixture avoids duplicating
// the test code necessary to initialize and cleanup those common
// objects for each test. It is also useful for defining sub-routines
// that your tests need to invoke a lot.
//
// <TechnicalDetails>
//
// The tests share the test fixture in the sense of code sharing, not
// data sharing. Each test is given its own fresh copy of the
// fixture. You cannot expect the data modified by one test to be
// passed on to another test, which is a bad idea.
//
// The reason for this design is that tests should be independent and
// repeatable. In particular, a test should not fail as the result of
// another test's failure. If one test depends on info produced by
// another test, then the two tests should really be one big test.
//
// The macros for indicating the success/failure of a test
// (EXPECT_TRUE, FAIL, etc) need to know what the current test is
// (when Google Test prints the test result, it tells you which test
// each failure belongs to). Technically, these macros invoke a
// member function of the Test class. Therefore, you cannot use them
// in a global function. That's why you should put test sub-routines
// in a test fixture.
//
// </TechnicalDetails>
#include "sample3-inl.h"
#include "gtest/gtest.h"
// To use a test fixture, derive a class from testing::Test.
class QueueTest : public testing::Test {
protected: // You should make the members protected s.t. they can be
// accessed from sub-classes.
// virtual void SetUp() will be called before each test is run. You
// should define it if you need to initialize the varaibles.
// Otherwise, this can be skipped.
virtual void SetUp() {
q1_.Enqueue(1);
q2_.Enqueue(2);
q2_.Enqueue(3);
}
// virtual void TearDown() will be called after each test is run.
// You should define it if there is cleanup work to do. Otherwise,
// you don't have to provide it.
//
// virtual void TearDown() {
// }
// A helper function that some test uses.
static int Double(int n) {
return 2*n;
}
// A helper function for testing Queue::Map().
void MapTester(const Queue<int> * q) {
// Creates a new queue, where each element is twice as big as the
// corresponding one in q.
const Queue<int> * const new_q = q->Map(Double);
// Verifies that the new queue has the same size as q.
ASSERT_EQ(q->Size(), new_q->Size());
// Verifies the relationship between the elements of the two queues.
for ( const QueueNode<int> * n1 = q->Head(), * n2 = new_q->Head();
n1 != NULL; n1 = n1->next(), n2 = n2->next() ) {
EXPECT_EQ(2 * n1->element(), n2->element());
}
delete new_q;
}
// Declares the variables your tests want to use.
Queue<int> q0_;
Queue<int> q1_;
Queue<int> q2_;
};
// When you have a test fixture, you define a test using TEST_F
// instead of TEST.
// Tests the default c'tor.
TEST_F(QueueTest, DefaultConstructor) {
// You can access data in the test fixture here.
EXPECT_EQ(0u, q0_.Size());
}
// Tests Dequeue().
TEST_F(QueueTest, Dequeue) {
int * n = q0_.Dequeue();
EXPECT_TRUE(n == NULL);
n = q1_.Dequeue();
ASSERT_TRUE(n != NULL);
EXPECT_EQ(1, *n);
EXPECT_EQ(0u, q1_.Size());
delete n;
n = q2_.Dequeue();
ASSERT_TRUE(n != NULL);
EXPECT_EQ(2, *n);
EXPECT_EQ(1u, q2_.Size());
delete n;
}
// Tests the Queue::Map() function.
TEST_F(QueueTest, Map) {
MapTester(&q0_);
MapTester(&q1_);
MapTester(&q2_);
}
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